‘Urban’ zones planned for West F’ville

The annexation last fall of 1,200 acres on Fayetteville’s west side was followed by an initial look at the potential for a new way of zoning the large acreage that surrounds Piedmont Fayette Hospital and extends to the Pinewood Atlanta Studios property to the north.

The Fayetteville City Council at its Feb. 25 retreat got a fresh look at the zoning proposal that could be up for discussion and a vote in the coming months.

City Community Development Director Brian Wismer said that following the announcement last year by Pinewood Atlanta Studios of their plans to locate in Fayette County, staff began working on the development of a master zoning and land-use plan for the surrounding area (now known as the West Fayetteville area) in an effort to control and guide anticipated development interest. Largely comprised of the newly annexed property, but also encompassing the Piedmont Fayette Hospital and Togwatee Shopping Center, the goal of the master plan is to encourage balanced growth, Wismer said.

“Since then, the consulting firm Historical Concepts, along with the Atlanta Regional Commission, city staff and Fayette County Development Authority staff has worked together to develop a zoning and land use plan that will guide future, quality growth in this area of the city. The culmination of these efforts is the (proposed) West Fayetteville Planned Community District (WFPCD) ordinance,” Wismer said.

The WFCD covers the 1,200 acres annexed into the city last fall and extends on the north side of Ga. Highway 54 from Tyrone Road on the west to east of Sandy Creek Road. The annexed area also extends north to the intersection of Veterans Parkway and Sandy Creek Road.

The result of the collaboration led to the proposal for a new zoning code, essentially a hybrid zoning code that will address the unique goals of the West Fayetteville community, Wismer said.

The WFCD proposal utilizes transect zoning, a type of zoning new to Fayetteville. Transect zoning replaces conventional separated-use zoning systems that have encouraged a car-dependent culture and land-consuming sprawl. Transect zones instead provide the basis for real neighborhood structure, which requires walkable streets, mixed use, transportation options and housing diversity. The zones vary by the ratio and level of intensity of their natural, built and social components, according to www.transect.org

The proposed zoning ordinance shows a mix of “T2 Rural” space along with “T3 Sub-Urban,” “T4A and T4B General Urban,” “T5 Urban Center” and SD (Special Uses). The conceptual vision lays out the designated development areas and a proposed street network in each, and includes only a general conception of the types of development that might be situated on the properties.

The proposal also includes a much smaller area not included in the annexation plans. That area is situated along the south side of Hwy. 54 from the Sandy Creek Road to the east and extending to Veterans Parkway to the west.

T2 Rural areas would include sparsely settled land in open or cultivated states. These include woodland, agricultural land and grassland. Typical buildings would include 1- or 2-story farmhouses, agricultural buildings, cabins and villas.

T2-zoned property would be located on the far east and northeast sides of the annexed area.

T3 Sub-Urban areas would consist of low-density residential areas adjacent to higher zones that have some mixed use. Home occupations and outbuildings would allowed. Setbacks would be relatively deep while blocks might be large and roads irregular to accommodate natural conditions. Parks and greenways would be included in the T3 areas and building heights would include 1- or 2-story structures with some 3-story buildings.

T3 properties would be located on the east and west sides of the annexed acreage.

T4A General Urban would consist of lower-scale, mixed-use development that supports the T3 zone. Retail, office and various types of residential structures would be included. Structures would include one or two stories and would feature shallow to medium front and side yard setbacks.

T4B General Urban would consist of a variety of residential and non-residential uses with 2- to 3-story structures. Building types would tend toward more urban forms. Streets would be laid out in grids and with buildings set somewhat close to or abutting sidewalks.

T4A and T4B properties would be located north of Veterans Parkway and south of Pinewood and would span the areas along the north and south sides of Hwy.54.

T5 Urban Center areas would consist of higher density mixed-use buildings to accommodate retail, offices, townhouses and apartments of 2-5 stories in height. This area would have a tight network of streets and wide sidewalks.

T5 properties would be located on the north side of Hwy. 54 to the west of Piedmont Fayette Hospital and, to a lesser extent, on the frontage area on the south side of Hwy. 54 and to the east of Veterans Parkway.

A final zoning category, SD, would feature structures of 1-5 stories and would include the areas of Pinewood Atlanta Studios and a portion of the property north of Hwy. 54 and west of Veterans Parkway.

Action by the council, if any, will come at a later date.

Husband and Fat...
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Car dependent culture

So the planners want to develop a car dependent culture in an urban setting. This means lots more traffic. Before any of this moves forward, someone needs to engineer and design the roadwork that needs to take place so that out commutes aren't negatively affected any more.

Whatcha going to do about this Mr. Commissioners.

moelarrycurly
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Whatcha gonna do

is build cart paths in this urban setting. No more Atl. commute, you are going to live here and work at Pinewood and just move along in your gas powered cart.

Seems to be some big issue with that new sewer crossing under Veterans Parkway right now for the last 2-3 weeks. Of course, the weather has been a mess, but seems maybe something bigger going on there. Lot's of head scratching bosses standing beside pickup trucks and no labor been going on there. I wonder what that is all about.

Finally, the studio buildings are developing some semblance of visual attractiveness. The stack stone and other architectural features are a welcome addition to those stark monolithic walls.

Davids mom
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Welcomed planning
Quote:

Before any of this moves forward, someone needs to engineer and design the roadwork that needs to take place so that out commutes aren't negatively affected any more.

Is this a possibility? Hope so!

Robert W. Morgan
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Good point again, DM, but sadly the answer is no they won't

The WFB was deemed a road to nowhere by several county commissioners including and especially the chairdog - Steve Brown. A road to nowhere by definition is not and cannot be a commuter road, so no they did not engineer a commuter road. Please don't worry about it.

Just curious, who is your district representative to county commission. Mine is Barlow and I'm not happy.

Cyclist
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Urband zones….

Enjoy the rural scenery of SR54 west of Fytvl while you can.

Husband and Fat...
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Remember this

http://fayettecountyissuesteaparty.org/Archives/Steve-Brown-campaign/ind...

Take a look at the photo of Hwy 54 at the bottom

Robert W. Morgan
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That looks like Steve Rapson with the "Obstacles" sign

How odd. How funny as well. The political architect of the Pinewood Studios deal - according to Doug, the dork on Channel 5.

Oh well, campaign promises are tricky things - especially when they can be preserved like this.

Husband and Fat...
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Yes RWM

I already know his excuse. We can't do anything about it because Fayetteville owns it now.

Really love where he says he will preserve the county's rural character and closely adhere to our land use plan and will reject increases in residential density.
Or
How about requiring developers to submit educational impact statements so we won't have to rezone schools again.

We may be an educated county, but were pretty stupid too. Bend over backwards to change for one business that is only here do to tax credits. Studios are breaking ground faster than a downhill skier diluting our profits already. What's going to happen when other states increase their tax credits?

Bad management and they haven't even started film 1.

If they urbanize this, many folks will be mad. The smart thing would be that they require the developer to build an elementary and middle school.

Davids mom
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A question
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The smart thing would be that they require the developer to build an elementary and middle school.

Are 'developer fees' used here ?

Robert W. Morgan
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Now there's a great question.

Are the developers paying any impact fees to Fayetteville or the county? Or did that just get overlooked during the fast shuffle by Pace/Foley/Wismer? Funny thing is that the man who used impact fees to the max when he was in PTC is Jim Williams who just happens to be a city councilman for Fayetteville which just annexed Pinewood.

Good point DM, no one has really asked that yet. Bet something interesting turns up.

Husband and Fat...
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Impact Fees

Both Fayette County and Fayetteville have impact fees. However the fee schedule doesn't have references to studios such as these. I don't remember what we did, but many municipalities cut or waived fees during the recession. Could it be that the reason the city is looking to the county for help is due to the lack of fees? They put a lot of new square footage of bldg out there.

What did the city or county rake in from impact fees?