Meet the West Fayetteville Neighborhoods

Artist's rendering of the West Fayetteville Neighborhood immediately to the west of the Piedmont Fayette Hospital, shown at extreme right. Graphic/Fayette County Development Authority.

Fayette Development Authority, F’ville map long-term plan to annex, develop 2,000 acres in mid-county

Picture a miniature version of a planned city like Peachtree City astride the new and controversial West Fayetteville Bypass in the middle of Fayette County.

Picture a thousand acres comprising six residential hamlets and neighborhoods, including parks and commercial areas in the rolling land around three sides of the Piedmont Fayette Hospital.

Picture a thousand acres left in its natural state as perpetual open space.

Now picture the westward envelopment of those 2,000 acres by the city of Fayetteville, some of which would be serviced by Fayetteville’s water and — most significantly — sewer system, and you’ve got a picture of the “West Fayetteville Neighborhoods,” the name of a plan jointly funded by the Fayette County Development Authority and the city of Fayetteville.

[To view the entire pdf package about West Fayetteville Neighborhoods, click on the file attachment link at the bottom of this story. CAUTION: The file is nearly 5 megabytes in size and may take a while to open or download.]

The FCDA paid for two-thirds of the $20,000 study, while Fayetteville paid the remaining one-third. The latest version of the plan document is dated May 26, 2010.

“To have such a large amount of property next to the hospital and to come up with a concept was the intent on the part of the development authority,” said FCDA President Brandt Herndon, adding the FCDA’s chief emphasis involves the areas adjacent to the hospital. “A master plan benefits everybody.”

Fayetteville Mayor Ken Steele agreed, citing a geographical reality as the reason in 2008 to pay for a share of the concept study. The West Fayetteville Neighborhood and the Crystal Lake Neighborhood concept areas are adjacent to the city limits while Piedmont Fayette Hospital, positioned between the two, is situated in the city.

“It was prudent to check out all eventualities for the future. We want to have input in the way the community develops. It’s irresponsible not to look at what types of development people will be anticipating in the future,” Steele said.

Back in the days of the Highway 54 Task Force in 2006 there was the potential that some portions of the property represented in the concept plan might be annexed into the city and provided with sewer service. That potential still exists.

“We won’t annex speculatively and we won’t annex if it is not an overall plus for the city,” Steele said of the areas in the more immediate vicinity of the hospital, adding that any future expansion of the hospital complex would require sewer service. “Annexation of any property would be a joint decision should that time come in the future.”

And that is the current reality of the West Fayetteville Neighborhoods concept plan. Though it successfully cuts against the grain of standard residential and retail development, the reality is that any future that it might have is contingent on the marketplace.

How the plan started

The development future of the large area of land along Ga. Highway 54 north and west of Piedmont Fayette Hospital in central Fayette County has long been the subject of community speculation.

What began in late 2006 as a development collaborative effort called the Highway 54 Task Force to create a master plan to offset piecemeal development in the 2,000-acre area has evolved into a revised concept called the West Fayetteville Neighborhoods.

The concept plan spearheaded by Historical Concepts of Peachtree City shows approximately 1,000 acres of developable land and 1,000 acres of trees, ponds and wetlands left as open space.

The plan shows development clustered into six “neighborhoods” and “hamlets” that retain approximately 25 percent open space.

Commenting on the concept plan for the area north of Hwy. 54 and stretching from east of Sandy Creek Road to Tyrone Road, Historical Concepts partner Aaron Daily said this land has been held by several families for generations, including the majority stakeholders from the Rivers, Lester, and Horton families, which account for approximately 50 percent of the land.

The recent visioning process that led to the concept plan included large and small land owners, the Fayette County Development Authority (FCDA), the Fayetteville Planning Dept., Historical Concepts staff, Miami architect Jaime Correa, Piedmont Fayette Hospital and potential higher learning institutions.

“The general consensus was to create a cohesive planned neighborhood that can be enjoyed by everyone,” the conceptual study reported. The visioning team started with an analysis of the existing site conditions and a proposed program for the land. A three-day brainstorming session that followed included several sessions of sketches and feedback from the FCDA and Fayetteville representatives. The visioning team incorporated the input from these entities and major stakeholders into this conceptual vision, the concept study said.

Guidelines for the vision

Several objectives and principles were outlined to guide the creation of the concept plan that provides a unified vision incorporating residential, office, institutions of higher learning, hospital expansion, athletic facilities, retail, and civic entities while integrating and preserving the existing landscape into compact, walkable, safe, and sustainable communities, the study noted.

“This vision improves upon the haphazard conventional suburban planning and implements traditional town planning principles that remind us of the small towns and neighborhoods that our parents and grandparents have enjoyed for generations. Inherent in traditional town planning are several elements that create a sustainable community. By providing the community needs within a comfortable walk or golf cart ride, you reduce the number of vehicle miles traveled and thusly improve the air quality of the neighborhood,” the study said.

Daily said that city and county zoning maps covering the 2,000-acre area show that the majority of the land is held as residential with single-use districts for the institutions such as Piedmont Fayette Hospital, a high school site for the Fayette County Board of Education, churches and commercial centers that include office and retail. It is evident that there is no distinct center of the community, resulting in a disjointed plan, the study said.

So what might the West Fayetteville Neighborhoods plan look like if brought to fruition sometime in the future?

The neighborhood look

The 2,000-acre site is located among the rural land to the north, east and west of Piedmont Fayette Hospital off Hwy. 54 and is bordered by Sandy Creek Road and Tyrone Road. The project study area encompasses land in both unincorporated Fayette County and the city of Fayetteville.

The concept plan for the 2,000-acre area shows that approximately half the acreage is targeted development with the remaining 1,000 acres untouched. The undeveloped area contains 300 acres of wetlands.

As envisioned, the developed areas would be clustered into neighborhoods and hamlets. Within the developed areas the open space is projected to total approximately 25 percent. The swap-off for having half of the 2,000 acres left untouched means having a higher density of the developable acreage designated for residential, retail and civic use. The concept plan, however, does not address the specifics of residential and commercial development since those issues would be part of a multi-step process that would require new architectural and development guidelines, said Daily.

The West Fayetteville Neighborhood would be located along Hwy. 54 immediately to the north and west of Piedmont Fayette Hospital and is essentially the centerpiece of the overall concept plan. Totaling 170 acres, the development as conceived would include 34 acres of parks and open space, especially along the West Fayetteville Bypass, and the hospital complex at 54 acres.

The west portion of the West Fayetteville Neighborhood would feature a large brick-paved plaza surrounded by a mixed-use neighborhood center, a performing arts hall and a church. The concept plan also includes significant space for an expansion of the Piedmont Fayette Hospital campus.

The West Fayetteville Neighborhood, excluding the 54-acre hospital campus, would include 20 percent open space.

Meet the hamlets

The Rivers Hamlet represents the northernmost development within the 2,000 acres and would be situated on either side of Sandy Creek Road. The Rivers Hamlet totals 300 acres that includes 28 acres of parks, 61 acres of farmland, 8 acres for an orchard and 5 acres for a farmer’s market. As conceived, the Rivers Hamlet would include 32 percent open space.

The Trammell Hamlet would be situated in the northwest portion of the concept plan area and totals 135 acres that includes 37 acres of farmland, 10 acres as a solar farm and 5 acres of park land. The Trammell Hamlet would include 39 percent open space and could connect by a path or road to the Lester Hamlet to the south.

The Lester Hamlet would be situated along Hwy. 54 between the West Fayetteville Bypass and Tyrone Road. The Lester Hamlet totals 172 acres that includes 60 acres for a potential high school, 18 acres of parks and 4.5 acres of pasture along Ga. Highway 54. The Lester Hamlet, excluding the 60-acre high school campus, would include 21 percent open space.

The Crystal Lake Neighborhood located immediately to the east of Piedmont Fayette Hospital and extending across Sandy Creek Road to Crystal Lake totals 126 acres with 25 acres as parkland, including a park overlooking Crystal Lake. The Crystal Lake Neighborhood would include 20 percent open space. The areas to the east and west are situated inside the incorporated area of Fayetteville.

The Horton Hamlet located adjacent to the west side of the West Fayetteville Neighborhood across the bypass totals 80 acres that includes a 26-acre park. The Horton Hamlet would include 33 percent open space and could connect by path or roadway to the Trammell Hamlet.

Distinctive differences

It is noteworthy, the study said, that the conceptual plan builds on Fayetteville’s downtown by creating a mixed-use neighborhood surrounded by small hamlets rather than continuing the long-held conventional single-use approach that dots the development landscape with strip malls, monotype housing subdivisions and office parks.

“Conventional highway development typically pulls from and guts downtowns by spreading uses apart, then paying in time and money to connect them over longer distances. By growing through complete neighborhoods and hamlets, Fayetteville can reduce the amount of local auto-oriented traffic while creating a pedestrian friendly environment that adds to the character of the city. This more compact form of development allows the city to preserve and integrate the natural settings the citizens have grown to love,” the concept plan document said.

The idea of clustering residential, retail and civic development works in tandem with the overall concept plan.

Daily said smaller homes and lots use less surface area than the conventional suburban planning which allows the community to preserve the existing landscape and farmland.

Integrating working farms into the communities maintains the character and history of its origins as well as creates an instant sense of place with farmer’s markets. Artists markets, events, and festivals can take place in any number of open parks scattered throughout the plan.

Each hamlet and neighborhood was designed with the intent of preservation and sustainability in creating great places to live, work and play.

Remember small towns

“The connectivity established throughout this plan is reminiscent of the old small towns in Georgia,” the plan noted. “The network of streets provides multiple routes to the same destination and breaks up the larger super-blocks that impede pedestrian activity. Each street will have a sidewalk encouraging local residents and visiting friends to walk to the nearest restaurant or shop. Numerous multi-purpose pathways weave through the undisturbed landscape connecting the hamlets to each other and the neighborhood.”

As conceived, the concept plan shows that the development of the neighborhoods and hamlets are not solely dependent on the West Fayetteville Bypass since the West Fayetteville Neighborhood and the Lester Hamlet front along Hwy. 54 and the Crystal Lake Neighborhood and Rivers Hamlet front Sandy Creek Road.

The concept study noted that the preservation of the existing landscape was a key component in creating the neighborhood and hamlets. Each parcel weaves existing tree cover, dirt roads, and significant tree lines into the plotting of the streets, blocks, and lots.

This gave each hamlet a unique characteristic unto itself by forming to the landscape and mature trees into which the hamlets and neighborhood are given instant character and charm to the street, according to the FCDA document.

Narrow tree lined streets significantly decrease the surface temperature by shading and reducing the amount of pavement, which also increases the longevity of the infrastructure with less maintenance, says the FCDA document.

Permeable sidewalks and parking lots allow storm-water to naturally return to the ground and reduce the capacity of infrastructure needed for water run-off thus reducing costs and improving local water quality, the document says.

Looking back, looking forward

The history that led to the concept plan goes back a number of years. At that time and for decades, the owners of large tracts of property across Fayette County sold their land to developers who, in turn, built many of the county’s subdivisions and commercial venues. The large property owners holding the 2,000 acres in the vicinity of the hospital could have done the same, the FCDA document says.

Proposed as an alternative to the customary form of development the Highway 54 Task Force was formed in late 2006 and was populated by large land owners in the area, the FCDA, Fayetteville, Piedmont Fayette Hospital and the Fayette County School System.

“The city and the county are continuously being approached by developers,” said then-Fayette County Commission Chairman Greg Dunn in late 2006. “We don’t want small random developments, only to end up with 2,000 acres of one-half acre lots. We want an overall concept plan in place between the city and the county. We think we can accommodate each other by using a common sense approach. This will send a message to developers that shopping around for more density won’t work. And the planning for this will go on for years with the quality we’re expecting.”

The concept plan included the areas north of Hwy. 54 and east of Sandy Creek Road and extending to Tyrone Road on the west. The plan called for future development efforts to include large areas of residential north of Hwy. 54, medical and other office use in proximity to Hwy. 54, limited commercial at Hwy. 54 and Tyrone Road and a potential institute of higher learning in proximity to the hospital and the proposed high school northeast of the Tyrone Road/Hwy. 54 intersection.

Residential density of one unit per 1-2 acres was forecast if the area remained in the unincorporated county. Density would potentially be reduced to one unit per half-acre if the area was eventually annexed into Fayetteville.

The northernmost area of the early concept plan, situated north and west of the Sandy Creek basin, would maintain a residential density of one unit per 2-3 acres, the plan said. No annexation was anticipated in this area.

The plan limited the amount of commercial development to the area to approximately 20 acres on the northeast corner of Hwy. 54 and Tyrone Road. The plan recommended a neighborhood shopping center to serve the immediate residential area. Plans recommended a grocery store anchor with a total shopping center maximum of 150,000 square feet of retail and the anchor store of no more than 56,000 square feet.

The intent was to limit the amount and type of commercial development so that it neither becomes a regional shopping destination nor competes with the commercial development in Fayetteville and Peachtree City, planners said.

The original concept plan also suggested the evaluation of an internal connecting road system within the study area to avoid increased traffic congestion on Hwy. 54. The internal road system could include the proposed West Fayetteville Bypass, a road from Tyrone Road to the West Fayetteville Bypass with connection to Huiet Road.

The Fayetteville City Council in January 2007 followed the Fayette County Commission and signed off on the concept plan.

It was nearly two years later in late 2008 that Historical Concepts entered the process and began meeting with essentially the same group to eventually arrive at the current concept.

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wanttoknow
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The neighborhoods. . . could turn things around!

There is nothing wrong with a well planned "AFFORDABLE" development. Hope this turns out to be some of them. It doesn't take an idiot to know that the reason that Waterlace is still empty is that the homes are priced out of the average family's budget. These developements can fill up those empty schools if some of them will be priced to accomodate teachers, fire and policemen and other young families who are wanting to work in our community and live here too (High $100's to mid $200's; and I'm not talking condos). With all the park space, they won't need big yards for their growing families.

I have no problem with some of the homes being senior geared either (Look at the Sun City in Griffin. . .Great developement). As a widow, I made a lot of sacrifices of other material things to be able to afford a home for my 2 kids so that they could attend schools in our county. Many others I know who would be great citizens for our county can't afford to live here and quite frankly, most middle age families are beginning to see the advantages of downsizing. 3000+ square feet of granite and hardwoods on a 5 acre minimum are just not needed by most families. If our board of commissioners allow real estate moguls to use this just to fill their pockets, then success will be hard to see. However, if our elected officials are truly interested in having our county grow, they will approve developements that will allow people to enter our market, let them outgrow those homes and then be able to find their upgrade home in the neighborhood just down the street. This will provide a constant rotation of resells and homes for new young families to move into as people upgrade.

grassroots
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Flight Path vs Cart Path

The current FAA/Hartsfield behemoth designated this area a new flight corridor after the 5th runway opened. There are currently 30,000 - 40,000 flights a year flying over between 5,000 ft -11,000 ft with 90,000 projected over the next ten years. That's estimated before the 6th runway is built. They started over my quiet neighborhood beginning may 17th, 2006 but told me after several complaints they'd always been there. Not true. The west flow turned east North of Hwy 92, now as far south as White Water creek. Trust me they're coming. West Fayetteville developers better be ready to sign full disclosures to prospective buyers that this is a 'Jet Noise Hazardous Zone' or the FAA Hartsfield will have to move. Can't wait for that showdown. I honestly hope the people below, including myself, can return to a noise and pollution free environment like the day I bought my house and lived for several years.

skyspy
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Community Septic

I would be worried about the noise. I would also be worried about the backups and stink from the community septic tank. Yuk.

Also how did you get the info on our new metroplex arrival and departures plans? I didn't think any of that has been finalized or released to the public. Just curious.

moelarrycurly
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Well, let's see

if they sell this high density crap to aging boomers, they will be deaf anyway, so the noise won't bother them, right? I mean that rock and roll is gonna catch up with you soon or later. No grass to mow, no yards to maintain. By then, KC and the Sunshine band will be performing for you at the new events center to be built (they will be wheeled in on gurneys from the hospital next door, but will you care?) That's the way, uh huh, I like it....uh huh, uh haaaaa...

Golf carts for everyone. Hospital right next door, nursing home across hwy 54, and a new assisted living unit gonna be built out behind the hospital. You can go visit all your friends just a hop, skip and a jump away. (Well, maybe not a skip)

With the new crosswalk across 54 at the hospital, you can use your walker to go get something to eat, or your electric scooter or electric wheelchair. All soft food restaurants by then, since no one will have any teeth to chew with.

The crime will have infiltrated the rest of Fayettedale by then, and you can buy your weed and pain pills and blue pills for the arthritis and other "little" issues on any street corner and just chill when those planes are lined up overhead. The words "fly me" will take on a whole new meaning...blissful, dontcha think?

grassroots
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Off Course

Yeah I kinda went off course on a tangent. Focus 'Ol man.
Who of us is psychic and knows about the real future other than those in power? But now I know why they turned down a similar plan offered by Del Webb for a retirement community around Piedmont. The property taxes on those over 65 are minimal in Fayette County and they wouldn't have children adding to the school enrollment averaging $12,000 cost per student as another income.
I'm not cynical about the proposals, just skeptical. What really has griped the people through all of this is the dishonesty. Just like big Gov lies, so did our local representatives. The ‘ruse’ that we needed a bypass because of traffic. Would the citizens have reacted the way we have if there would've been open and transparent meetings with homeowners and taxpayers over the last few years? Like those who were concerned about the environment like Dennis Chase and others. What about those who lost by way of eminent domain.? Disclosures could've been made to those who unsuspectingly bought along the phases of WFB and are now devalued to 1/3rd their purchase price. I watched them all lied to and treated poorly at several meetings and through public PR. But no, they have to arrogantly hide and mislead and treat us (you taxpayers who are reading this) like peasants and condescend like Frady/Smith. Am I naive enough to think they will be more forthcoming and honest with us in the future? How else will they raise taxes and win elections. Now that the ruse is out that it’s not a bypass but a developer’s parkway, does that open for review the legality of eminent domain?

MYTMITE
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mlc, you ought to be doing their PR work for them. You paint

such a pretty picture---Won't do any good to put up the barriers around the little " way station" in the middle of the road at the hopsital-- those oldie goldies will be playing dodge em with their electric scooters and knocking down those barries left and right. Can't wait!

moelarrycurly
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my

you are right, except for on tiny item. "Those" golden oldies will soon be "us" golden oldies. That's the bad news. The good news is there are millions of us boomers creeping into the "oldies" so we will all have plenty of company, no matter where we end up.

guitaaron
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Where's the Demand?

This sounds fantastic, and five years ago I would have been all for it. Unfortunately, we presently find ourselves struck by the clue-bat of economics. One half mile south of the planned site, hundreds of empty lots still exist in the Waterlace development, and there are many such developments, either incomplete or abandoned entirely, scattered throughout the county. They have been slow to fill because of the economy, yet this project appears to assume the opposite to be true. I don't understand how flooding the market with more supply can reasonably be expected to bring more demand. I haven't heard of any major job creators coming to Fayette county, so I'm wondering what the demand for such a project really is. In the best case, it will be a very, very long time before the community sees any measurable return on the investment. In the worst case they are building a ghost town, and doing it partly at taxpayer expense.

That said, it is reassuring to see the local government actually engage with the developers and plan for growth, rather then repeat the mistakes made all over Atlanta in the 80's and 90's.

The 5-0
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Looking ahead

I'm guessing that since these developments won't be move-in ready for several years, they're hoping that the housing market will have corrected itself by then.

rmoc
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Tried Before: Lexington village with empty lots and empty homes

Wasn't Lexington Village supposed to be like this plan?? It seems to have failed too even though it was spitting distance from the PTC cart paths...and this was when the economy was good. Folks that move here want space not the city feel, this is why the townhome communities have not been a success in PTC. Homes in PTC have been low density for the most part.

BHH
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rmoc, amen to

"Folks that move here want space not the city feel".

These developers and most politicians still don't get it.

They are only anticipating an aging populace wanting to move into smaller, lower maintenance homes and appealing to more of the people who move south from the high living costs of places like New York.

They don't care about those who are trying to maintain a lifestyle that they have dreamed of for their retirement years to pass down to their children.

Those are the ones who were forced out to build the bypass.

Woody
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Start Planning the West West-Fayetteville Bypass

With the planned growth and traffic along the West Fayetteville Bypass, why not start planning the West West-Fayettevile Bypass? Or, we could make a East West-Fayetteville Bypass and call it Highway 54.

The 5-0
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Nice Job!

Those are some very nice looking communities. Those developers have put together a good plan. I hope they're allowed to continue.

I sympathize for the homeowner's who had their property damaged by the road construction; but overall, this development will help the entire county (increased tax revenue, prestige and will help to reinvigorate the population to help put an end to our declining population).

...now I wait for anti-bypass people to start a flame war because of my comment...

NUK_1
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Looks great!

It would be better if they were able to do this development with willing homeowners who previously agreed to sell their land instead of how it all transpired.

This project is not going to be completed soon and there isn't going to be "5,000 houses" there next year as Don Haddix stated here a couple of weeks ago as the lending and real estate markets are horrid right now. Down the road though, this will look good and be an asset to FC. Historic Concepts does excellent work and it is evident here. The follow through will be the key.

BHH
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So where is Frady's connection to all this?

He must be intending to profit from development south of Hwy 54 in the next phase of planning.

Either that or his pockets are already bulging from a pay off from this phase.

This is all very interesting to say the least.

moelarrycurly
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Someone explain to me

where you are going to squeeze thousands more cars onto Hwy 54 in PTC and downtown Fayetteville for those that will have to travel east/west to get to where they need to go? From Newnan to Jonesboro and back, tell me where is the road planning for this future gridlock???

ginga1414
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They've Painted A Pretty Picture, But

They've Painted A Pretty Picture, But
Who is going to pay for it?

I can tell you right now that there are a whole lot of families along Tillman Rd., Eastin Rd., Lee's Mil Rd., and Janice Dr. who have been paying for this pretty picture for the last three years. And, we aren't through paying for it. Some of us will be paying for it the rest of our lives.

While some of us are paying for the beautiful designs and conceptual renderings of the West Fayetteville Neighborhoods with our daily lives, our quality of life, and property values, people like the Rivers family, the Adams family, realtor and family member Jan Trammell, the Addison Lester III family, and the Horton family will be prospering by the millions.

YES, WHEN JACK SMITH, ERIC MAXWELL, HERB FRADY, ROBERT HORGAN, LEE HEARN, AND MAYOR KEN STEELE SAID THAT THE WEST FAYETTEVILLE BYPASS WAS TO RELIEVE TRAFFIC IN DOWNTOWN FAYETTEVILLE, THEY LIED, BOLDLY AND WITH NO REMORSE.

COMMISSIONER HEARN SAID THAT HIS COUSIN, ADDISON LESTER III, WOULD NOT BENEFIT BECAUSE OF THE WEST BYPASS. NOTE HOW CLOSE TO THE WEST BYPASS “LESTER HAMLET” WILL BE. DO I NEED TO SAY IT AGAIN? THE LESTER FAMILY SOLD PROPERTY TO THE BOARD OF EDUCATION FOR THE NEW HIGH SCHOOL.

COUSIN ADDISON SITS ON THE BOARD OF THE FAYETTEVILLE DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY. HE WAS NOMINATED FOR A SEAT ON THE ELECTIONS BOARD BY HIS COUSIN. FRADY, HORGAN, AND HEARN SECURED HIS SEAT ON THE ELECTIONS BOARD AGAINST GREAT PUBLIC PROTEST.

THE WEST FAYETTEVILLE BYPASS/VETERAN’S PARKWAY WAS AND IS A MEANS TO AN END THAT WILL FINANCIALLY BENEFIT THE ADAMS, RIVERS, TRAMMELL, HORTON, AND LESTER FAMILIES. THOSE FAMILIES HAVE THEIR OWN BUILT-IN DEVELOPERS AND BUILDERS. THE GREEN/WYATT FAMILY HAS ITS OWN BUILT-IN DEVELOPERS AND BUILDERS.

NOW WE KNOW WHY THE THREE AMIGOS WOULD NOT BUDGE IN FURTHERING THE WEST BYPASS. IT’S NOTHNG BUT A HIGH DENSITY DEVELOPER’S ROAD. IS IT ANY WONDER THAT LEE HEARN REFERRED TO THE WEST FAYETTEVILLE BYPASS AS HIS “BABY?”

WE, THE TAXPAYERS OF FAYETTE COUNTY, HAVE BEEN PAYING HERB FRADY A SALARY FOR THE LAST TWENTY YEARS. THE CITIZENS OF FAYETTEVILLE HAVE BEEN PAYING MAYOR KEN STEELE A SALARY FOR THE LAST TWENTY YEARS.

THE FAYETTE COUNTY DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY HAS SHELLED OUT WHO KNOWS HOW MUCH MONEY TO HAVE HISTORICAL CONCEPTS ARCHITECTS, PLANNERS & PLACEMAKERS TO DESIGN THIS OH SO PRETTY PICTURE.

I WOULD REALLY LIKE TO KNOW WHERE THEY THINK THEY ARE GOING TO GET THE MONEY TO BUILD THE THING. THE TAXPAYERS PAID FOR THE DESIGNS, NOW WHO IS GOING TO PAY FOR ALL THE HAMLETS, PARKS, PATHWAYS, ETC.?

The 5-0
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Rage Much?

Is your Caps Lock key stuck or something?

suggarfoot
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!!!!Well look what fell out of the closet!!!!

Frady, Hearn, and Horgan, are nothing but ball faced liars!

As we have been telling you guys for 2 years the WEST FAYETTE BYPASSS IS NOTHING BUT DEVELOPER WELFARE AT TAXPAYER EXPENSE!!!!!

This is why Smola, Smith, and Lee Wright, built Rivers Elementary, this is why the West Bypass just had to be built!

YOU HAVE PAID FOR SCHOOLS AND THE BYPASS TO PUMP UP THE DEVELOPERS PROFITS.

I WISH SOMEONE WOULD TAR AND FEATHER THIS WHOLE BUNCH!

Robert W. Morgan
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This is really a good idea

Not one word about the density or total number of homes, but even without that data I really like the idea of pre-planning the entire area. That way there are no surprises for buyers or builders or government. Preplanning is why Peachtree City worked so well. And it seems obvious that there will be several different styles, sizes and price ranges of houses instead of the cookie cutter stuff you see everywhere.

And the hamlet idea is a really clever way of getting each landowner/developer his fair share of the density and sharing in the non-profitable open space. Very, very good. Todd Strickland and his company need to stay involved in this to correctly implement the plan.

Of course this is a 10-year plan that won't be started for another 5 years given the current real estate market, but it is still good to know what is expected ahead of time. Of course this means that Steve Brown was right about WFB being a developer's road, but so what. And this will fill up the schools and then some. I'd guess this will produce a minimum of 3,000 students.

Cyclist
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RWM

"won't be started for another 5 years"

Is this a best case scenario?

Robert W. Morgan
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Well sure Cy, think about it

The property isn't zoned or developed yet and even after that happens someone has to build streets and utilities with the expectation of receiving enough money to reimburse them for the $30,000 per acre development cost plus the $25,000 per acre land cost and then they need to sell lots to a builder for about $70,000 per lot to make a profit. Or $35,000 per lot if they get 1/2 acre zoning. Or (dream on Todd and friends) - 1/3 acre zoning for $15,000 Sound good so far?

Well, consider the fact that one bank has sold lots to the Reynolds people for $12,000 - instead of $70,000 and we will soon see other banks selling similar lots for $6-7,000 - 10% of what new development would cost. Sad, but true. It will take years for the bank-dumping price-suppression policies to be overcome. Not to mention the fact that they won't loan anyone any money unless they are buying or developing bank-owned property.

5 years minimum before this sorts itself out.

Kinda sucks, doesn't it?

suggarfoot
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Joined: 10/10/2007
bank-dumping price-suppression policies

"It will take years for the bank-dumping price-suppression policies to be overcome. Not to mention the fact that they won't loan anyone any money unless they are buying or developing bank-owned property."

Or...real estate agents, developers, and homeowners, to say enough, and bridal the banks. They are making a ton under the table throwing people out of their houses and selling them at a discount, then being paid back the difference by the taxpayer on government backed loans.

halfdollarandlost
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suggarfoot

Still harping on this? I'm still waiting for you to post something that proves this, you're last effort didn't even have anything to do with you claims.

Robert W. Morgan
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Joined: 10/26/2005
Something else to watch out for - Rezoning and annexation

Anybody have any doubt that the PR campaign for the villages and hamlets is not connected to an effort to get this property rezoned and annexed by Fayetteville before the 3 amigos on county commission get retired next year? While it is true that most of the actions to make that happen need to be taken by Fayetteville city council (led by Ken Steele who will be reelected so he can oversee his pet project), it is much easier if the Fayette County Commission does not object to the overall plan. Pretty obvious that the 3 deciding votes (Frady, Hearn, Horgan) won't object to this, but after they are unelected next year and Steve Brown is Commission Chair - who knows.

Come to think of it, the timing of the press release that The Citizen reprinted may be tied to Steele's reelection effort as well. That would explain why his picture was put in the middle of the press release on page one of the newspaper. Wonder if Steele's opponent gets equal space next week? I wonder if his opponent is for or against this development? Might make the election a little more interesting if he's against - then there can be one real issue to debate.

Everyone knows there is no market demand for this project now or in the foreseeable future, but that is the best time to get things like this pushed through. Dirty little political fact of life.

That being said, I still like the project and applaud the whole idea of preplanning.

Cal Beverly
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Not a press release, Dead DJ — far from it

Your premise is just flat out — if I may say, dead — wrong.

This plan has been under the public radar for three years. Nobody in official circles was pushing for this hot potato to be revealed.

I found out about the existence of it only recently when shown a 2008 version of the plan by a developer who thought the plan had merit. An Open Records request got us the latest version of the ongoing revision of the plan.

By the way, that 2008 version showed a dense commercial cluster on both sides of the West Fayetteville Bypass at its intersection with Ga. Highway 54. That has since disappeared.

Ken Steele was invited (by me, face to face, at the last Lunch on the Lawn at the courthouse) to walk us through the pros and cons of the plan while I and my two reporters reviewed the plans at the office of the Fayette County Development Authority. He declined.

You can bet your last 45rpm record that nobody in Fayetteville or anywhere else was eager for this information to be released.

That said, and to be fair, nobody tried to stonewall or sidetrack us, either, once we went after the documents.

But to call this detailed reporting a "press release" is just insulting and reveals a lack of understanding about what real local news reporting is all about.

If what you are looking for is "press releases" and the party line, read the other things that call themselves newspapers.

MYTMITE
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Joined: 02/14/2008
Thank you Mr. Beverly for bringing this to our attention. Sure

answers a lot of questions. Seems like there may be much more that can be ferreted out and that you are the man to do it. Would be interesting to know just who is planning on building what, and just what their connection to sitting council members is, if any--and just when all these plans began---It all just seems a little too fishy.

moelarrycurly
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I KNEW IT, I KNEW IT

Cal Beverly will get this travesty out in the open. Ken Steele is behind this crap along with the 3 amigos and have been covering it up.

FCDA, what else are you hiding from us? Ken Steele won't talk to the local press? Why not, Kenny? 20 years catching up with you now?

FAYETTEVILLE VOTERS, GET TO THE POLLS AND VOTE FOR ANYONE BUT KEN STEELE FOR MAYOR

NUK_1
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Steele's opponent Greg Clifton

Greg is a classy and solid guy and I think he deserves a chance. Steele needs to head into retirement.

Citizen_Steve
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Joined: 11/20/2005
Incorporation

I think an incorporation as West Fayetteville or an entirely new name would be a better, although unlikely route. Those in charge have made a mess of things in Fayetteville and their MO has been to just keep moving to the undeveloped areas to try again. An entirely new authority would be a better bet, along with a change of the Fayetteville guard with those who have turn-around experience to get Fayetteville back on track.

Robert W. Morgan
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Can't do it without sewer

and Fayetteville controls that. Or Peachtree City could offer to run its sewer lines out there and annex them and everything in between. We do have excess capacity, doncha know. Just kidding.

ginga1414
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As A Member of The Fayetteville Development Authority

Did Commissioner Lee Hearn's cousin, Addison Lester III, help DEVELOP the Lester Hamlet within the West Fayetteville Neighborhoods Community?

Could that possibly be called a conflict of interest? After all, the Lester family owns the property!

Ninja Guy
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I Said A Few Days Ago

that the West Bypass is the savior of the school system!

Go (fill in name of mascot of new high school)!

Angry Taxpayer
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Mascot for new high school

Given the proposed location of a new high school near the West Fayetteville Bypass, I suggest the mascot should be the "Bandits"!

suggarfoot
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Yes! Steve was right about the bypass, was there ever any doubt?

"Of course this means that Steve Brown was right about WFB being a developer's road, but so what. And this will fill up the schools and then some. I'd guess this will produce a minimum of 3,000 students."

What we have indeed is a developer road paid for by some very poor taxpayers at present. The money that we had been taxed for this COULD HAVE BEEN USED to payoff some of our outstanding debt, because of the recent law passed for the present financial emergency the residences are in. But no, Horgan, Hearn, and Frady wouldn't hear of their little darlin developers being asked to wait to swill the public's money for their private projects.

It is true...IF.. you get someone to buy the houses in this dismal market, it will fill up Rivers that was built SEVERAL YEARS AGO.

Look at the exspense to the taxpayers for Smith, Smola, and Wright's stupidity. Not to mention what it has done to the paychecks of the teachers. I hope this next election people remember this and vote for someone who is intelligent and at least finished 4 years college (nope Smola didn't) Don't listen to the stories about "wizardess of wall street" cause that is all they are...stories.

Robert W. Morgan
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Naw, nothing like that. Chill sugar

It is simply secret long term planning by those who know better than we peasants do. Nothing wrong with that - unless of course the insiders like Hearn and Horgan profited. Doubt we will ever know.

This is business as usual in Fayette County, sugar. Don't stress about it.

lion
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Joined: 12/16/2005
Bypass

Good god. Is this whining about a new road going to go on forever?

Please build the West Bypass and move on.

Perhaps then can begin planning for mass transit in Fayette County.

kcchiefandy
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Joined: 09/18/2009
and then devolve...

...into West Clayton County. Mass transit certainly helped save that county, by golly...! We're going to have to raise taxes to build bigger jails...

ginga1414
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Joined: 09/01/2008
lion, You Better Watch Out

Your home and property might be next. YOU MIGHT GET WHAT YOU WISH FOR!

kcchiefandy
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Joined: 09/18/2009
It does make one wonder...

...why all of a sudden this 'community' idea is being studied! Hasn't that land been there, lying mostly fallow and/or farmed, for many, many years, and now that a nice, new, high-speed bypass is being built they decide to do a study?! I had often heard of small town GA corruption (think 'Macon County Line'?!), but wow, given the current housing crisis, economy, etc...are these commissioners, mayors, et al, just prophetic? Things that make you go 'hmmmmmm...?'. Perhaps, though, even w/ projected declining enrollment in our schools, they KNOW the city/county is going to grow this way (I would have bet on farther south, below Whitewater HS and beyond)?