Columnists

Visioning & Fayette’s non-profits

Cathy Berggren's picture

By Cathy Berggren and Sheryl Watford

For many of us, Fayette County has been our home for many years. It is truly a “place to call home.” Just like the rest of our world, we have seen changes. Many of the changes have happened intentionally because of the role our leaders have played in looking ahead. We have the benefit of our hospital because of that insight and planning.

By now, you may have heard about the work of the Fayette Visioning Initiative once again, striving to intentionally plan for the future of our community. Read More»

How freedom dies

Pat Buchanan's picture

“Religious Right Cheers a Bill Allowing Refusal to Serve Gays.”

Thus did the New York Times’ headline, leaving no doubt as to who the black hats are, describe the now-vetoed Arizona law to permit businesses, on religious grounds, to deny service to same-sex couples.

Examples of intolerance provided by the Times: Read More»

Let them eat cake

Cal Thomas's picture

In Arizona has come a test of the motto conservative Christians like to invoke: “Hate the sin, love the sinner.”

Republican Governor Jan Brewer has vetoed the “religious freedom bill” passed by the Republican legislature. While there is no mention in the bill of same-sex marriage, or even homosexuals, most people believe same-sex marriage and homosexuals were the targets of the proposed law. Read More»

Don’t let the law get away with Georgians’ property

Benita Dodd's picture

There’s no doubt that Georgia’s law enforcement officials dislike strings that restrict civil asset forfeiture, which is the power of law enforcement to seize and keep property suspected of being involved in criminal activity. They’ve told legislators that time and again. Read More»

Most serious problems for blacks rooted in culture, not racism

Walter Williams's picture

People in the media and academia are mostly leftists hellbent on growing government and controlling our lives. Black people, their politicians and civil rights organizations have become unwitting accomplices.

The leftist pretense of concern for the well-being of black people confers upon them an aura of moral superiority and, as such, gives more credibility to their calls for increasing government control over our lives. Read More»

President Obama is all talk, no do

William Murchison's picture

Well, we saw it coming. But wait, that’s getting it backwards. We ought to have seen it coming. And we didn’t — “we” as a collective: we, the American people acting in our sovereign capacity as voters.

Why was it not plain to us in 2008, and yes, again in 2012, that Barack Obama was an unlikely choice for Leader of the Free World, not to mention head policy director of the World’s Most Dynamic Economy? Read More»

Living the American dream

Ronda Rich's picture

Somewhere along the line, it seems, people have stopped talking about the American Dream.

I can’t recall the last time I heard anyone, in person or through the media, remind folks that we live in the greatest country on earth and that here in this land of profound freedom, opportunities abound, and no one, regardless of race or level of economic upbringing, is held back from grand and lofty aspirations. Read More»

Murphy strikes again

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

We all know Murphy’s Law, but did you realize there really was a documented “Murphy?” His name was invoked by the development engineer overseeing repairs to a malfunctioning strap transducer at Wright Field Aircraft Lab at Edwards Air Force Base, California, in 1949.

Captain Ed Murphy was quoted by George Nichols, used it in a press conference, and it went viral within a few months. Researchers have claimed attribution for this story, some very persuasive, but this is the first I’ve seen that appears “so spot on.”
The law? “If anything can go wrong, it will.” Read More»

Yep, I’m rich!

Rick Ryckeley's picture

Never thought I would ever see so much money, and yet it was just lying there for the taking. All I had to do was get to it before my three brothers and the riches would be mine.
This was easier said than done when you’re the youngest and only 8 years old. Trickery would definitely be called for.
We stood in the parking lot of the Piggly Wiggly, frozen just for a moment at the sight. Not one, but two 20-dollar bills tumbled across the asphalt propelled by a stiff March wind. Read More»

John William Holloway

David Epps's picture

John Holloway was a pastor to me, one of two men in my life who completely fulfilled that role. I first met him in 1995 when, after he called me on the telephone in response to an inquiry I made, we met for lunch in Griffin, Ga.

He and I shared some common ground. We had both served as United Methodist pastors, both had been influenced by the charismatic movement, were both married to strong, capable women, and both had three sons — although he would add a daughter some years later. Read More»