Columnists

Yep, I’m rich!

Rick Ryckeley's picture

Never thought I would ever see so much money, and yet it was just lying there for the taking. All I had to do was get to it before my three brothers and the riches would be mine.
This was easier said than done when you’re the youngest and only 8 years old. Trickery would definitely be called for.
We stood in the parking lot of the Piggly Wiggly, frozen just for a moment at the sight. Not one, but two 20-dollar bills tumbled across the asphalt propelled by a stiff March wind. Read More»

John William Holloway

David Epps's picture

John Holloway was a pastor to me, one of two men in my life who completely fulfilled that role. I first met him in 1995 when, after he called me on the telephone in response to an inquiry I made, we met for lunch in Griffin, Ga.

He and I shared some common ground. We had both served as United Methodist pastors, both had been influenced by the charismatic movement, were both married to strong, capable women, and both had three sons — although he would add a daughter some years later. Read More»

‘The Walking Dead’ and living in debt

Bonnie Willis's picture

A colleague of mine shared that she and her husband are avid fans of the TV blockbuster, “The Walking Dead.” I have never seen the show, so she described to me how the most fascinating part was the drama of seeing how people connect and process living in a post-apocalyptic world.

It was not, as some might think-the battle between humans and zombies, or gory killings seen each week. She further explained that one “turns” into a zombie if they are bitten. Read More»

Fayette schools good, but challenges remain

Leonard Presberg's picture

Some findings from the Fayette Visioning Initiative Competitive Assessment:

“Stakeholders are fiercely proud of the local schools and recognize the importance of protecting and further nurturing such an asset.”

“The education system has been the jewel for the community and a beacon that has brought many families to the county.”

“There is little doubt that public schools in Fayette County are among the best in the state of Georgia.” Read More»

The ‘fairness’ fraud

Thomas Sowell's picture

It seems as if, everywhere you turn these days, there are studies claiming to show that America has lost its upward mobility for people born in the lower socioeconomic levels.

But there is a sharp difference between upward “mobility,” defined as an opportunity to rise, and mobility defined as actually having risen.

That distinction is seldom even mentioned in most of the studies. It is as if everybody is chomping at the bit to get ahead, and the ones that don’t rise have been stopped by “barriers” created by “society.” Read More»

Separation of state and news

Cal Thomas's picture

After much criticism from conservative quarters, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has decided, at least for now, to withdraw plans for its proposed study of how media organizations gather and report news.

The expressed goal of the survey was to determine if the “critical information needs” of the public are being met.

In making the announcement on Friday, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler indicated the survey would be “revised” and that the government agency had “no intention” of regulating political speech of journalists or other broadcasters. Read More»

The truth behind the ‘staffing surge’ in Ga. public schools

Ben Scafidi's picture

Cuts to family budgets have been significant since the Great Recession began in late 2007. Likewise, cuts to public school budgets in Georgia and nationally have been significant as well. That said, the economic challenges facing public schools during the Great Recession need to be put in historical context.

A recent Georgia State University policy brief reported an 18.9 percent increase in the state’s public school teachers between 2001 and 2012, and a 28 percent increase in school-based administrators. Read More»

A boy named Juan

Ronda Rich's picture

Thousands of days, all those filled with clouds, rain, snow or sunshine, have passed since that time, yet the lesson sticks stubbornly to my heart.

For two years, I spent Tuesday afternoons volunteering as a mentor in an elementary school where every child was poor. An astounding 96 percent of them qualified for free or reduced price lunches. The vast majority of them had traveled with their families from a desperate country where, though it’s hard to imagine, they had been even poorer than the life they found in America. Read More»

Second Surgery

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

Few family crises tug more at the heart of mother than not being with her child when she is in pain.
Mary had to undergo another operation for a ragged rotator cuff.
Yes, the first one was just last fall, but once that healed up, the other began to make itself felt and she went ahead and scheduled surgery.
Why would a 50-something pianist come down with what is usually regarded as an athletic ailment when she is so careful about nutrition and fitness? And why did this develop in the first place? Read More»

“The greatest challenge” Mr. Kerry?

David Epps's picture

From CNN — “Saying that climate change ranks among the world’s most serious problems — such as disease outbreaks, poverty, terrorism and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction — U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry called on all nations to respond to ‘the greatest challenge of our generation.’”

“Climate change,” is, of course, the new packaging for what, for years, has been called “global warming.” Read More»

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