Opinion

Endorsing candidates in primary season

Bonnie Willis's picture

You may have noticed that I have been publicly “silent” during this primary season regarding my stance on the various candidates and elections.

That is not to say, however, that I have not given my support through donations and personal volunteer efforts, for, indeed, I have. And it is my personal conviction that one ought to be involved in, or at least be cognizant of the process in which their representatives are being chosen. There is simply too much at stake.

That being said, there are at least three reasons why I have chosen not to voice my opinion on the various primary races. Read More»

The role of senior housing in Fayette’s vision

Vickie Butler's picture

As a member of the Fayette County Visioning Steering Committee, I’ve had the opportunity to lend my voice and support to this county-wide initiative since September 2013.

During my participation in several of the focus groups and community events, I’ve heard time and time again about the growing demographic of the 55+ boomer and mature adult community, and less about housing solutions for attracting more young professionals and their families.

I believe what is needed for counties to attract growth is a commitment to town-center walkable communities. Read More»

Gay rights? Forget free speech

Cal Thomas's picture

Once, Social Security was the “third rail” of politics. Touch it and face political death. Now it is homosexuality. Criticize anything gay people do and you risk ostracism, fines, suspension or loss of your livelihood.

Michael Sam, the first openly gay player to be drafted by a National Football League team — the St. Louis Rams picked him 249th in the last round — is being treated by the media and those in the gay rights movement as the equivalent of an early American pioneer. Read More»

The ultimate sacrifice: Remembering our heroes

Dr. Mark W. Hendrickson's picture

Last year on Memorial Day, my wife, daughter and I were touring Cambridge, England. We took a bus ride three miles out of the city to the U.S. military cemetery there – one of 25 American burial grounds administered by the U.S. government on foreign territory. Cambridge University showed their deep gratitude for their American ally in World War II by donating 30 acres to serve as a final resting place for 3,812 Americans stationed in England who lost their lives in the war. Read More»

America’s civil religion: Presidents and Memorial Day

Dr. Gary Scott Smith's picture

Throughout American history presidents have often used religious rhetoric for various reasons: to provide comfort and consolation, argue that God providentially directs our nation, celebrate our Christian heritage, defend democracy, hold citizens and the country accountable to transcendent standards, help accomplish their own political aims, justify America’s actions, foster traditional morality and justice, promote prayer and Bible reading, call for national and individual repentance, unite Americans, and satisfy citizens’ expectations. Read More»

Decisions made in youth

Ronda Rich's picture

To this conclusion I have come: the most deadly years of our lives are the ages 16 to 21. Those years give us a headiness that comes from new freedom — a driver’s license — and the passing of the torch from strict childhood rules to more trust, different restraints and relaxed curfews.

When you add the opportunity to go off to college or move out on your own, we’re fooled into thinking that we’re mature enough and wise enough to make decisions that will affect the rest of our lives.

It’s scary. Read More»

District voting for Democrats

I agree with Mr. Lowry’s statement that the real purpose of the NAACP lawsuit was not to address a racial concern.

Indeed the record before the court failed to demonstrate any racial discrimination. The real purpose of the lawsuit was to help liberal Democrat candidates get elected in Fayette County.

However, because a political party is not a “protected class,” the NAACP did the bidding for the Democrats by once again improperly and shamefully playing the race card. Read More»

King: In defense of Kim Learnard

Ms. Smithfield: A rebuttal.

Your assertion that it was [Councilwoman Kim] Learnard who is responsible for our council’s moment of silence is totally baseless.

In fact, it was my suggestion that we have this moment to allow all in attendance to quietly ask guidance of their deity prior to the Pledge of Allegiance.

I did this because I feel one’s religion is personal, and I see no need to display one’s religion over another.

If you’re looking to cast blame, I’m your target. To date, council has received only one public comment on the change and it was to thank us. Read More»

Credit card breaches seem on the increase

My **** credit card was compromised when someone “skimmed” the information on the magnetic strip. On March 28, someone used that information to make an $800 purchase at an electronics store in Greenville, S.C.

My bank caught that, cancelled the card, refunded the bogus credit, and issued me a new card.

The new card was compromised less than three weeks later. Someone made a $1.50 purchase at a vending machine in Sioux Falls, S.D. My bank caught the bogus charge and cancelled the card. Read More»

Ghost from the past

Rick Ryckeley's picture

Mom said it best, “Don’t make that ugly face at your sister. It’ll be stuck like that the rest of your life.”
Okay, stop laughing. That ugly face I made at my sister never stuck, but it seems I did something way back then that actually did.

My past has finally caught up with me. Last week it sent me to the hospital and under a surgeon’s knife. Yep, I can’t believe it either.
For all you parents out there about to send your kids off to college, reading the rest of this story should put you at great ease. Read More»

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